Question and Answer

The OPC on Wikipedia

Question:

Wikipedia describes the OPC as a white, politically conservative denomination. Is this intentional or an accident? Are non-white people and political liberals welcome to attend or join an OPC? Thanks for your help!

Answer:

Thank you for your question.

As you may know, Wikipedia is produced by various contributors and seldom by those who are therein described. So, while it may have a page about the OPC, it is not "our page" in the sense that we have submitted anything or agreed with anything there, as is OPC.ORG. As to whether the description is accidental or intentional, I have no information (not knowing who posted it there).

I can say that it is misleading. I suspect that a majority of our membership is Caucasian and politically conservative. Generally speaking, those who are conservative in theology will tend to be conservative in politics. So I expect this to be the case in most theologically conservative churches. Speaking personally, I never inquire into the political opinions of my flock. I have, on the other hand, heard from various ones everything from "I always pull the big D lever" to "I can't even vote this year because there is not a true conservative." From the various bumper stickers that I've seen in our church parking, opinions differ though the majority seems to be more conservative politically.

Racially, the OPC came into being in the early 1900's out of essentially Caucasian churches. Because of our covenantal emphasis, many of our members are descendents of those earliest members. On the other hand, virtually all of the OPC church congregations which I know have members of various races.

I cannot say that my own experience is typical, but I suspect that the "lily white" congregation is the exception rather than the rule. And as the Lord continues to bless us with growth, the genetic mix is more and more closely reflecting the population at large in the areas where we have churches.

I hope you find this useful. I would encourage you to visit a local OPC to see us in the flesh, rather than a digital portrait offered by a stranger.


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