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Praying Together: The Priority and Privilege of Prayer in Our Homes, Communities, and Churches

Megan Hill

Reviewed by: Jean Gaffin

Date posted: 03/05/2017

Praying Together: The Priority and Privilege of Prayer in Our Homes, Communities, and Churches, by Megan Hill. Crossway, 2016. Paperback, 160 pages, list price $12.99. Reviewed by OP member Jean Gaffin.

Corporate prayer is vital to the life of the church and yet, so few really participate in it outside of the minister’s congregational prayers. Why don’t more people participate in prayer meetings?

Corporate prayer is hard work. Learning how to do it joyfully and fruitfully is the business of us all. That is why I highly recommend a wonderful little book, Praying Together, by Megan Hill. This book would serve a Bible study group well. It has nine chapters and study questions for each chapter.

Her approach is so biblical and her style so engaging that when you close the book, you can’t wait to pray. Her use of biblical and historical illustrations, her obvious breadth of reading on this subject, and much personal experience give weight to her arguments.

The wife of a PCA pastor, and a regular contributor to Christianity Today and Gospel Coalition websites, Mrs. Hill commends to us the blessing of a corporate prayer life.

Her first section develops the biblical foundations for corporate prayer. Her first chapter beautifully outlines the relationship we have with the Trinity in prayer. She says, “Prayer is an activity of relationship: God and us, God and God, all of us and our God.” She moves on to the duty of prayer, which she says we will take seriously when we understand its importance as an expression of “the very essence and life of the church” (Lloyd Jones). The promise of prayer is her third foundation.

In the second part she speaks of the fruits of praying together: love, discipleship, and revival. These are powerful chapters. The chapter on revival is so appropriate in these darkening days for the gospel. Praying Christians have the best tool to defeat the forces of evil that seem to be gaining strength here and globally.

Finally, she gives practical ideas for implementing prayer in the church, prayer with partners and groups, and prayer with family and guests. At a time when Wednesday evening is no longer reserved for prayer meetings in many places, we can still implement corporate prayer in ways that suit our present situation, rather than letting it be a thing of the past.

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